POWER AND REFRIGER A TION CYCLES:THE BRAYTON CYCLE WITH REGENERATION

THE BRAYTON CYCLE WITH REGENERATION

In gas-turbine engines, the temperature of the exhaust gas leaving the turbine is often considerably higher than the temperature of the air leaving the compressor. Therefore, the high-pressure air leaving the compressor can be heated by transferring heat to it from the hot exhaust gases in a counter-flow heat ex- changer, which is also known as a regenerator or a recuperator. A sketch of the gas-turbine engine utilizing a regenerator and the T-s diagram of the new cycle are shown in Figs. 8–34 and 8–35, respectively.

The thermal efficiency of the Brayton cycle increases as a result of regeneration since the portion of energy of the exhaust gases that is normally rejected to the surroundings is now used to preheat the air entering the combustion chamber. This, in turn, decreases the heat input (thus fuel) requirements for the same net work output. Note, however, that the use of a regenerator is recommended only when the turbine exhaust temperature is higher than the compressor exit temperature. Otherwise, heat will flow in the reverse direction (to the exhaust gases), decreasing the efficiency. This situation is encountered in gas-turbine engines operating at very high pressure ratios.

The highest temperature occurring within the regenerator is T4, the temperature of the exhaust gases leaving the turbine and entering the regenerator. Under no conditions can the air be preheated in the regenerator to a temperature above this value. Air normally leaves the regenerator at a lower temperature, T5. In the limiting (ideal) case, the air will exit the regenerator at the inlet temperature of the exhaust gases T4. Assuming the regenerator to be well insulated and any changes in kinetic and potential energies to be negligible, the actual and maximum heat transfers from the exhaust gases to the air can be expressed as

POWER AND REFRIGERATION CYCLES-0328POWER AND REFRIGERATION CYCLES-0329

A regenerator with a higher effectiveness will obviously save a greater amount of fuel since it will preheat the air to a higher temperature prior to combustion. However, achieving a higher effectiveness requires the use of a larger regenerator, which carries a higher price tag and causes a larger pressure drop. Therefore, the use of a regenerator with a very high effectiveness cannot be justified economically unless the savings from the fuel costs exceed the additional expenses involved. The effectiveness of most regenerators used in practice is below 0.85.

Under the cold-air-standard assumptions, the thermal efficiency of an ideal Brayton cycle with regeneration is

POWER AND REFRIGERATION CYCLES-0330POWER AND REFRIGERATION CYCLES-0331

Therefore, the thermal efficiency of an ideal Brayton cycle with regeneration depends on the ratio of the minimum to maximum temperatures as well as the pressure ratio. The thermal efficiency is plotted in Fig. 8–36 for various pressure ratios and minimum-to-maximum temperature ratios. This figure shows that regeneration is most effective at lower pressure ratios and low minimum- to-maximum temperature ratios.

POWER AND REFRIGERATION CYCLES-0332POWER AND REFRIGERATION CYCLES-0333

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