The Current Situation and Perspectives on the Use of Solar Energy for Electricity Generation:Belgium

Belgium

In 2012, the country has a total installed solar power capacity of 2,650 MW, which represents 12.8 % of the total installed capacity and 46.91 % of the total renewable installed capacity. Belgium occupies the place number 8 at world level according to the total solar power capacity installed in the country (2.65 % of the world total). At regional level, Belgium occupies the place number 5 (3.78 % of the regional total). According to the Global Market Outlook for Photovoltaic until

The Current Situation and Perspectives on the Use of Solar Energy for Electricity Generation-0085

2015 report, the country now has more than 800 MW of installed capacity, with slightly more than 700 MW in Flanders, 90 MW in Wallonia, and the rest in the region of Brussels. The rest of the capacity is in other types of solar energy, such as CSP. The solar PV market from 2011 onward should remain between 200 and 300 MW. The country installed 215 MW in 2013, after having reached high levels in 2011 and 2012, in a context of strong political concern over the cost of support schemes and long discussions about retrospective measures and additional grid fees for producers (Masson et al. 2013).

While development in Flanders is likely to accelerate without policy changes, the potential in Brussels and particularly Wallonia will depend on the future of support schemes.

During the past ten years, the role of solar energy in the energy mix of the country increased in eight years. In 2012, the use of solar energy increased 29.21 % with respect to 2011.

Electricity Generation Using Solar Energy

The evolution of the use of solar energy for the generation of electricity in Belgium during the period 2008–2012 is shown in Fig. 4.9.

According to Fig. 4.9, the use of solar energy for the generation of electricity in Belgium during the period 2008–2012 increased 50-fold. It is expected that the role of solar energy in the energy mix of the country will continue increasing during the coming years, particularly if the decision of the government not to build new nuclear power plants is implemented during the coming decades.

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